GEM – Gendered Illnesses of the ‘Sick Man’: Modernisation in the late Ottoman Empire

Gendered Illnesses of the ‘Sick Man’: Modernisation in the late Ottoman Empire

Presented by Demet Gülçiçek (University of Warwick)

The Whitting Room (Arts 436), University of Birmingham

5:15 PM 22nd November 2017

 

Modernisation in the context of Ottoman Empire was mostly considered as curing the ‘sick man’. The Ottoman Empire was sick, the cure was in Europe; but the ways to reach the cure was the main discussion. In relation to these discussions, modernisation took different forms under different regimes in the Ottoman Empire but gender was always one of the main constitutive elements during these processes. I will try to show how the discourse of the sickness, the cure and reaching the cure – modernisation in general – was produced through gendered discourses.

‘Wrong’ modernisation (also called Westernisation) debates within the intellectual circles of the time (late 19th century and early 20th century) is a good case to understand the complexity between modernisation and gender. Wrong modernisation was seen as a deviation from an ‘essence’ which might refer to different notions such as Ottoman, Muslim, Turkish based on the context. But in any case, mentioning to wrong modernisation was possible through constitutions of femininities and masculinities. As an example, I will be focusing on two characters from two different novels (Felatun Bey and Rakim Efendi by Ahmet Mithat and Ask-i Memnu by Halit Ziya). Through these novels, I will try to show how too-modernised male figure was feminised and how too-modernised woman figure was presented as immoral.

22217990_10213045134419753_1276024878_oMithat Kutlar, “Osmanlı Kadın Dergileri içinde Erkekler Dünyası Dergisi,” Fe Dergi 2, sayı 2 (2010):1-15.

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GEM – Gendered Illnesses of the ‘Sick Man’: Modernisation in the late Ottoman Empire

Teaching Fellow, University of Watwick

Lecturer (Teaching Focused) in Classics and Ancient History (HUM-08361)

University of Manchester

Application deadline: 8th July 2016

This position is designed to cover teaching, administrative, and related duties within the Division, covering particularly those course units in classical material culture.

You will contribute to the teaching, assessment and administration of course-units in Classical Archaeology, and to supervise dissertations and long essays at undergraduate level, as well as contributing to the pastoral care of students. You will be particularly responsible for first year course unit CLAH10121 and second year course unit ARGY20042. Some contribution to Ancient History teaching will also be required.

You will also be encouraged to involve yourself in the life of the Department and/or Division.

As an equal opportunities employer, we welcome applications from all suitably qualified persons. However, as black and minority ethnic (BME) candidates are currently under-represented at this level in this area, we would particularly welcome applications from BME applicants. All appointments will be made on merit.

Enquiries about the vacancy, shortlisting and interviews:

Name: Dr Andrew Morrison, Head of Classics and Ancient History

Email: andrew.morrison@manchester.ac.uk;

Tel: 0161 275 3024

General enquiries:

Email: hrservices@manchester.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 275 4499

Technical support:

Email: universityofmanchester@helpmeapply.co.uk

Tel: 01565 818 234

For more information and to apply, click here.

Teaching Fellow, University of Watwick

Teaching Fellow, University of Warwick

Teaching Fellow – Greek (78192-066)

University of Warwick

Application deadline: 12th July 2016

Fixed Term Contract for 10 months from 1 September 2016

Interview dates: 26 and 27 July 2016

You will provide teaching in Greek language, history, and culture, replacing Dr Michael Scott who is on research leave.

You will organise and teach the modules Greek Literary Texts + Greek Religion, contribute to the first-year core module Greek Culture and Society, and supervise undergraduate dissertations.

You will need experience in lecturing, leading seminars, marking and giving constructive feedback, supervising, and language teaching.

This is an opportunity to gain a wide range of teaching experience within a supportive department, with undergraduates from a variety of backgrounds, devising your own teaching materials within the scope of the current prescriptions for these modules. You will be involved in many aspects of departmental life, tracking students’ progress, participating in staff meetings, our Classics Dept Greek Theatre Outreach Event for schools, and Open Days. You will be expected to be available to students at least 3 days a week in the department during term time.

For more information and to apply, click here.

Teaching Fellow, University of Warwick

Research Fellow, University of Warwick

Research Fellow (77950-046)

University of Warwick

Application deadline: 16th May 2016

Fixed term for 30 months.

Token Communities in the Hellenistic World

A fixed-term postdoctoral position is available as part of the ERC-funded project ‘Token Communities in the Ancient Mediterranean’. The position will be based in the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Warwick, and will be supervised by the project’s PI, Dr. Clare Rowan. This position offers an opportunity for a promising postdoctoral researcher to develop their research profile and gain valuable experience in one of the UK’s leading classics departments. Applications are invited from scholars with interests in archaeology, ancient history, material culture and/or numismatics.

The ‘Token Communities in the Ancient Mediterranean’ project will provide the first comprehensive analysis of the role played by tokens in the ancient Mediterranean. Tokens are frequently found on archaeological sites and within museum collections, but are little studied and poorly understood. These objects played a central role in cultural, religious, political and economic life in antiquity; closer study of these objects is thus imperative in gaining a fuller picture of the ancient world and its cultural legacy. The project combines an analysis of museum material with the known archaeological contexts of these objects. It will be the first project to approach these items in a cross regional and fully contextualised manner. This approach will enable us to better define what tokens were in antiquity, and what roles they played. Moreover, through a careful consideration of imagery, text, context, and distribution, the project will also explore how these objects actively contributed to the generation of different types of community. The project thus has a theoretical focus that connects to the broader scholarly trend focused on the role of ‘things’ in constituting human society.

As a postdoctoral researcher, you will focus on tokens and token use from the Hellenistic period (late fourth to first centuries BC). American excavations at Athens, for example, have revealed the role played by tokens within this city; these were objects connected to the very fabric of civic life, used for entry to the theatre, at the assembly, council, law courts, grain distributions, with clay tokens being interpreted as forms of military identification. This demonstrates the active role of tokens in constituting communities and identity in the Hellenistic world. Other discoveries have demonstrated that tokens operated in other contexts or as currency in the broader Hellenistic period. As a postdoctoral researcher you will examine the types, materiality and contexts of Hellenistic tokens, identifying a series of case studies in order to explore the role(s) played by these objects. Combining a close analysis of the objects themselves and their known archaeological contexts with a theoretically informed approach to the past, you will contribute to the project’s broader research questions. These are:

  • What were the defining characteristics of tokens within the ancient world?
  • What political, economic, religious, cultural and social roles did tokens play in the Hellenistic and Roman worlds?
  • How did these objects enable and actively contribute to social life and the formation of different communities?
  • What can the study of ancient tokens contribute to the study of alternative currencies more broadly?

The postdoctoral position is focused on tokens of the Hellenistic world (late fourth to first centuries BC). In addition to performing your own research, you will work as part of a research team consisting of the PI (‘Token Communities in Rome and Italy, 1st century BC – AD 284’), and two PhD students (‘Token Communities in the Roman West, 1st century BC – AD 284’, and ‘Token Communities in the Roman East, 1st century BC – AD 284’). You will participate in regular research meetings, reading groups, and other collaborative activities. You will assist the PI in jointly editing a volume arising from an international conference on tokens, and in organising a further conference to be held at the British School at Rome in 2018. You will disseminate your own research through conference/seminar presentations, blog posts, and other media, and will produce at least two academic articles. The project offers generous funding for conference attendance, research trips, consumables (including a project laptop), as well as publication costs. We also offer, if desired, further training and career development, both through the department of Classics and Ancient History and the University more broadly (e.g. the possibility of some teaching, numismatic training if required, acquisition of foreign languages, digital storytelling, media training).

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

  • to conduct research on tokens in the Hellenistic world, identifying case studies of interest, working in collaboration with the project’s PI, Dr. Clare Rowan
  • to assist the project’s PI in editing a volume arising from an international conference, and to assist in organising a conference at the British School at Rome in 2018
  • to write at least two academic articles arising from your research
  • to disseminate your research via conference and seminar presentations, the project’s blog, and other multimedia (e.g. the project’s website, Twitter feed, videos, etc)
  • to work as part of the broader project team, participating in project meetings and other project activities
  • to be committed to public engagement and widening participating activities that arise as a result of the project

For more details or to apply, click here.

Research Fellow, University of Warwick

PhD studentship, University of Warwick

PhD studentship (2 positions)

Department of Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick

Application deadline: 16th May 2016

  • The position includes a home/EU fees waiver, research costs, and a stipend equivalent to RCUK stipend amounts (currently £14,296 for 2016/17).
  • Fixed term for 3 ½ years
  • Start date 1/10/16
  • Token Communities in the Roman East / Token Communities in the Roman West

Two fully funded 3 ½ year doctoral positions are available as part of the ERC-funded project ‘Token Communities in the Ancient Mediterranean’. The positions will be based in the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Warwick, and will be supervised by the project’s leader, Dr. Clare Rowan, with secondary supervision provided by Prof. Kevin Butcher. This represents an opportunity for graduate students with high potential to work on a project aimed at uncovering a little used and little known source from antiquity.

The ‘Token Communities in the Ancient Mediterranean’ project will provide the first comprehensive analysis of the role played by tokens in the ancient Mediterranean. Tokens are frequently found on archaeological sites and within museum collections, but are little studied and poorly understood. These objects played a central role in cultural, religious, political and economic life in antiquity; closer study of these objects is thus imperative in gaining a fuller picture of the ancient world and its cultural legacy. The project combines an analysis of museum material with the known archaeological contexts of these objects. It will be the first project to approach these items in a cross regional and fully contextualised manner. This approach will enable us to better define what tokens were in antiquity, and what roles they played. Moreover, through a careful consideration of type, context, and distribution, the project will also explore how these objects actively contributed to the generation of different types of community.

Two doctoral researchers will focus on the projects ‘Token Communities in the Roman West’ (1st century BC – AD 284) and ‘Token Communities in the Roman East’  (1st century BC – AD 284) respectively. The successful candidates will work with the PI (Clare Rowan) to identify a series of fruitful case studies focused on tokens and token use from the eastern and western Mediterranean in the Roman period before late antiquity. Utilising available archaeological data, as well as relevant museum material, the successful candidates will focus on the following questions:

  • What were the defining characteristics of tokens within the ancient world?
  • What political, economic, religious, cultural and social roles did tokens play in the Roman world?
  • How did these objects enable and actively contribute to social life and the formation of different communities within the Roman Empire?

The PhD topic will be of interest to scholars concerned with the role of everyday objects in society, as well as the active role of images and material culture in forming identities and communities. The successful candidates will work alongside the PI, Clare Rowan (‘Token Communities in Rome and Italy’), as well as a postdoctoral researcher (‘Token Communities in the Hellenistic World’), participating in project meetings, reading groups, and will contribute to joint publications. The successful candidates will disseminate their results via the project’s blog, website, Twitter feed, and other media.

The successful candidates will also join the broader postgraduate community at the University of Warwick and will be expected to participate in the department’s work in progress seminars, as well as the annual departmental postgraduate colloquium. In addition to a home/EU fees waiver and a stipend, the project offers generous financial support for international research trips, conference attendance, consumables (including the provision of a laptop), and publication costs. Both the department of Classics and the University, via the Faculty of Arts CADRE programme, offer training and career development opportunities for postgraduate students (e.g. media training, teacher training, digital storytelling, experience in engagement and widening participation activities).

Eligibility:

We are seeking candidates with high potential who are able to work within a team environment. The successful applicant will have a good background in Ancient History and/or Archaeology at undergraduate and Masters level, and hold a first or upper second class honours degree (BA), and will have completed a Masters level certification by 1 October 2016. A reading knowledge of foreign languages and/or numismatic experience is desirable but by no means essential; training will be provided for successful candidates.

International students are invited to apply but will need to fund the fees difference for Overseas Research Students.

How to apply:

Interested candidates are asked to submit the following documents by 16th May 2016 to C.Rowan@warwick.ac.uk:

  • a letter of application (max. 2 A4 pages) explaining how the position connects to previous research interests and any previous relevant experience, and why the candidate feels they are suited for the position
  • a curriculum vitae
  • full transcripts of all previous degree results
  • evidence of competence in English if English is not your first language
  • a writing sample (max. 7000 words)
  • two academic references submitted by the referees. These should be sent by the referees themselves, and not the applicant. The referees should ideally be familiar with the candidate’s academic work, and able to assess their potential and preparedness to undertake PhD research as part of a team project. It is the responsibility of applicants to ensure that references are received by the deadline.

Interested candidates are invited to contact the project PI Clare Rowan (C.Rowan@warwick.ac.uk) to discuss the position, or for any further queries.  Further information about the Department of Classics at the University of Warwick is available here.

Interviews will take place at the beginning of June. The successful applicants will be required to complete a standard application for graduate study at the University of Warwick.

PhD studentship, University of Warwick