20th ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM OF THE CENTRE FOR BYZANTINE, OTTOMAN AND MODERN GREEK STUDIES

20th ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM OF THE CENTRE FOR BYZANTINE, OTTOMAN AND MODERN GREEK STUDIES

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CELEBRATIONS IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN: PRIVATE AND PUBLIC

 1ST JUNE 2019, UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM

Arts Building, Arts LR1 and LR3

 

9:00-9:30 Registration and Coffee

9:30-9:50 A Tribute to Ruth Macrides

Professor Leslie Brubaker

Panel One: Celebrations and Identity (Chair Vicky Kaisidou)

9:50-10:15 Banquets as a theater of cultural difference in 12th century Byzantine romance

Zoe Kokka (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)

10:15-10:40 Archbishop Makarios III, the 1st April, and the creation of “the Cypriot”

Antonios Savva (University of Birmingham)

10:40-11:05 Modern Greek Celebrations – A Journal Ethnography

Holly Chalcraft (University of Durham)

11:05-11:20 Coffee Break

Panel Two: Public Celebrations (Chair Dr Christopher Markiewicz)

11:20-11:45 The Brumalia festival from Rome to Byzantium: continuity or ideological remaking?

Elena Nonveiller (EHESS Paris)

11:45-12:10 Celebrating sanctity. The public celebrations of saints in Coptic hagiography

Chloé Agar (University of Oxford)

12:10-12:35 The ‘Giostra’ as celebratory propaganda in Renaissance Crete: La nobilissima barriera della Canea: poema cretese del 1594 by Giancarlo Persio

Amanda Skamagka (University of Athens)

12:35-13:00 Privacy in public: transgressions at the Greek Orthodox carnival in late Ottoman Istanbul

Sada Payir (University of Oxford)

13:00-14:00 Lunch

Panel Three: Religious Celebrations (Chair Dr Daniel Reynolds)

14:00-14:25 Chrysostom’s Catechetical Homily on Pascha (CPG 4605): a case study in approaching the question(s) of Pseudepigrapha

Mark Huggins (University of Edinburgh)

14:25-14:50 ‘Blood for the Blood God!’. The survival of ritual sacrifice in Late Antiquity and Beyond

Michael Burling (University of Birmingham)

14:50-15:15 The celebration of saints in Theodore the Studite’s Hymns

Maria-Lucia Goiana (University of Vienna)

15:15-15:40 Pascha in Contemporary Greek poetry: five poets at the Cross

Mariza Parasyri (King’s College London)

14:40-16:00 Coffee Break

Panel Four: Celebrations and the Imperial Ceremonial (Chair Lauren Wainwright)

16:00-16:25 ‘Daphne/Laurus‘: triumphal rhetorics and wedding ceremonies in the Imperial Palaces of Late Antiquity

Alfredo Calahorra Bartolomé (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

16:25-16:50 The imperial dress and the coronation ceremony: the etiquette and the signs of excellence of the rank

Antonio Pio Di Cosmo (Pontificio Istituto Orientale)

16:50-17:15 The political significance of Maria Skleraina’s ceremonial performances as Sebaste (1042-1046)

Ewan Short (Cardiff University)

17:15-17:40 When celebration goes wrong: the collapse of the Middle Byzantine honours system

James Cogbill (University of Birmingham)

17:40-18:00 Final Remarks

Dr Rhoads Murphey

18:00 Wine reception

Registration for the event can be found at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/celebrations-in-the-eastern-mediterranean-private-and-public-tickets-60699884990.

A book stall and poster display will be running throughout the day in Arts LR3.

Come and celebrate with us!

The Organising Committee

Rachael Helen Banes

Alessandro Carabia


This is a student-led postgraduate colloquium organised under the auspices of the College of Arts and Law, University of Birmingham. 

CFP Colloquium 2019

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Diogenes- Call for Contributions

The editors of Diogenes are welcome to announce the Call for Contributions for the next issue of Diogenes to be published in October 2019. The deadlines for contributions is the 30th of May!

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CFP- The 20th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies

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Celebrations in the Eastern Mediterranean: private and public

 1st June 2019, University of Birmingham

 

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers in celebration of the 20th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK.

From antiquity to the present peoples in the eastern Mediterranean have taken part in celebrations and ceremonies. These vary from large-scale public events to private and personal rituals. As we continue to take part in social rituals derived from these traditions and develop new ways to manifest them it is important to examine these celebrations in detail.

The colloquium aims to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives on how people experience celebrations across the eastern Mediterranean from late antiquity to the modern day, from textual sources to visual culture and archaeology.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Anniversaries, holidays, weddings
  • Feast days and holidays
  • Secular and religious ceremonies
  • Processions
  • Gift giving
  • Festivals
  • Celebrations in text and art
  • Spaces and Objects

Papers of approximately 20 minutes and posters (A3 format) related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than Sunday 7thApril 2019 at  2019CBOMGSColloquium@gmail.com.

A selection of papers will be published in the proceedings on the online journal Diogenes (https://gemuob.wordpress.com/diogenes/)

Come and celebrate with us!

The Organising Committee

Alessandro Carabia (University of Birmingham)

Rachael Helen Banes (University of Birmingham)

CFP Colloquium 2019

The 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies (University of Birmingham)

colloquium

PROGRAMME

THE EVENT IS FREE AND ALL ARE WELCOME, BUT REGISTRATION IS NECESSARY. TO REGISTER, PLEASE VISIT HERE.

HURT AND HEALING: PEOPLE, TEXTS, AND MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN

THE 19TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM OF THE CENTRE FOR BYZANTINE, OTTOMAN AND MODERN GREEK STUDIES

SATURDAY 2 JUNE 2018

G51, EUROPEAN RESEARCH INSTITUTE, UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM

9:00–9:30 Registration & Coffee

9:30–9:45 Opening Remarks

9:45-10:30 Keynote

Jim Crow (University of Edinburgh)

10:30–12.10 Panel 1- From Collective Trauma to Reconstruction

Chair: TBC

On how to treat the Traumas of Conquest: The Implementation of Ottoman Rule in mid-15th Century Macedonia, The Case of the vilayet of Kastoria

Dimitrios Lamprakis (University of Birmingham)

Hurting the weaker to appease the mightier: Manuel I, Venice, and the relocation of the Pisan quarter

Daniele Morossi (University of Leeds)

From the Darkness Came Light: The Emergence of a New ‘Working Class’ in 6th and 7th Centuries Byzantium

Aristotelis Nayfa (The University of Edinburgh)

The Gothic trauma? Looking for evidence of the effect of the 5th-century settlement of Goths in the Pieria area (Northern Greece)

Kyriakos Fragkoulis (University of Birmingham)

12:10–12:25 Tea and Coffee

12:15 –13:40 Panel 2- Medical discourses: on Healing and the Psyche

Chair: TBC

Re-Reading the portrait of Empress Elisabeth of Vienna: visual arts, psychoanalysis, pre-feminism. A palimpsest via the literary and artistic strategies of the superego

Stella-Alkistis Moysidou (Cambridge)

Masonry, Medicine, and Monotheism: the Conversion of the Volga Bulgars in the Kyssa’i Yusuf, the Risāla of ibn Fadlān and the Tārīkh-i- Bulghār

Alex Feldman (University of Birmingham)

Healing the blind. Description of miracles performed by Saints.

Nikolaidou Evanthia (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)

13:40–14:40 Lunch

14:40–16:20 Panel 3: Dealing with Unhealed Wounds

Chair: TBC

A trauma that was never healed: depicting the 200 of Kaisariani as heroes and/or victims in Rita Boume-Papa’s Οι Διακόσοι (1944)

Anastasia Tantarouda-Papaspyrou (University of Birmingham)

Antonin Artaud and Romos Filiras: Towards a comparative approach of personal trauma as an element of poetic narrative.

Nikoleta Kouti-Spyrantzou (University of Athens)

Healing the Body Politic and Corporal: Revolutionary Doctors in the late Ottoman Empire

Christin Zurbach (University of California, Berkeley)

Synthesis between Byzantine and Coptic Eucharistic rites in the Celtic Church – a starting point for healing the rift.

Melangell Roe-Stevens- Smith (University of Birmingham)

16:20–16:35 Tea and Coffee

16:45–18:15 Panel 4: Spaces of  Hurting and Healing

Chair: TBC

Sacred spaces, stolen spaces, Saving spaces

Michael Burling (University of Birmingham)

Constructing the ethereal and earthly bond between pilgrimage and the holy spring: A case study of the Hagiasma of Philip the Apostle

Tülay Yeşiltaş (University of Birmingham)

Athens in Late Antiquity: Christianizing pagan buildings

Panagiota Mantovalou (University of Birmingham)

Art of Healing and Healing Saints in the Art of Byzantine Cappadocia

Şükran Köse Ünser (Hacettepe University)

18:15-18:30 Closing Remarks

19.00 Wine Reception

For more information please visit: https://cbomgs2018colloquium.wordpress.com


This is a student-led postgraduate colloquium organised under the auspices of the College of Arts and Law, University of Birmingham and with the generous support of the Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies and the journal ‘Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies’. 

CFP- 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies

colloquium

*CALL FOR ABSTRACTS*

‘Hurt and Healing: people, texts, and material culture in the Eastern Mediterranean’.

2nd June 2018, University of Birmingham

 

The Committee is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the 19th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK.

The concepts of hurt, trauma and healing cross between the different disciplines that deal with Eastern Mediterranean. The colloquium aims to explore transformations and multifarious dimensions of the notions of trauma and wreckage, and their opposition, healing, from the Late Antiquity to the Present.

Whilst serving as antitheses to one another they are also complementary. After destruction and breakage comes the need for repair. However, when a broken textile’s ripped edges are joined again, the visible seam signifies the damage that has happened. Trauma and healing are key concepts in medicine, psychology, and sociology. However, political ideology has constantly used them in order to justify the rising and the existence of authoritarian regimes. In the past, medicine, saints, and magic offered different ways for healing the body and the soul. The current aim of restoration practices is to heal remnants of cultural heritage after damage and to prevent damage with appropriate conservation strategies.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Healing power of saints and healing people in society;
  • Medicine and magic;
  • Cultural heritage and material culture: restoration and preservation practices, as well as preventive actions for the preservation;
  • The individual aspects of trauma,especially in relation to the politics of gender, sexuality, class, race, and identity (sexual abuse, domestic violence, shame and fear, death and mourning or melancholia);
  • Collective experiences of trauma (war, genocide, terrorism, victims and perpetrators, practices of memory and oblivion);
  • Migration from the Late Antiquity to the current migration crisis and harrowing events in refugee camps;
  • Public health and medical, therapeutic approaches to illnesses and trauma from the Late Antiquity tothe Present;
  • Texts and images related to medical practices

 

Papers of approximately 20 minutes related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than Monday 7th April 2018 to 2018cbomgscolloquium@gmail.com. Applicants will be notified of selection by 21thApril 2018.

 

For more info visit https://wordpress.com/view/cbomgs2018colloquium.wordpress.com

The Organising Commitee

Vassiliki Kaisidou

Stephanie Novasio

Flavia Vanni

GEM- Investigating Ottoman-Armenian socio-cultural relationships in the 19th century through Turkish print media in Armenian script.

Investigating Ottoman-Armenian socio-cultural relationships in the 19th century through Turkish print media in Armenian script.

Presented by Kubra Uygur

The Whitting Room (Arts 436), University of Birmingham

5:15 PM 17th January 2018

This research seeks to look into the Turkish print media in Armenian script published during the third quarter of the 19th century to understand inter-communal encounters between Ottoman and Armenian community. The research aims to explore the following questions:’What are the dynamics of inter-communal encounters enabled by Turkish  print media in Armenina script, 1850 to 1885? And ‘What can we garner from inter-communal encounters enabled by Turkish print media in Armenina script in relation with the contemporary Armenina Turkish literature?’

This study puts special emphasis on the periodicals: Mecmua-i Havadis, Manzume-i Efkar, Seda-i Hakikat, Ruzname-i Ceride-i Havadis and Varnaka-i Havadis.

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