20th ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM OF THE CENTRE FOR BYZANTINE, OTTOMAN AND MODERN GREEK STUDIES

20th ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE COLLOQUIUM OF THE CENTRE FOR BYZANTINE, OTTOMAN AND MODERN GREEK STUDIES

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CELEBRATIONS IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN: PRIVATE AND PUBLIC

 1ST JUNE 2019, UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM

Arts Building, Arts LR1 and LR3

 

9:00-9:30 Registration and Coffee

9:30-9:50 A Tribute to Ruth Macrides

Professor Leslie Brubaker

Panel One: Celebrations and Identity (Chair Vicky Kaisidou)

9:50-10:15 Banquets as a theater of cultural difference in 12th century Byzantine romance

Zoe Kokka (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)

10:15-10:40 Archbishop Makarios III, the 1st April, and the creation of “the Cypriot”

Antonios Savva (University of Birmingham)

10:40-11:05 Modern Greek Celebrations – A Journal Ethnography

Holly Chalcraft (University of Durham)

11:05-11:20 Coffee Break

Panel Two: Public Celebrations (Chair Dr Christopher Markiewicz)

11:20-11:45 The Brumalia festival from Rome to Byzantium: continuity or ideological remaking?

Elena Nonveiller (EHESS Paris)

11:45-12:10 Celebrating sanctity. The public celebrations of saints in Coptic hagiography

Chloé Agar (University of Oxford)

12:10-12:35 The ‘Giostra’ as celebratory propaganda in Renaissance Crete: La nobilissima barriera della Canea: poema cretese del 1594 by Giancarlo Persio

Amanda Skamagka (University of Athens)

12:35-13:00 Privacy in public: transgressions at the Greek Orthodox carnival in late Ottoman Istanbul

Sada Payir (University of Oxford)

13:00-14:00 Lunch

Panel Three: Religious Celebrations (Chair Dr Daniel Reynolds)

14:00-14:25 Chrysostom’s Catechetical Homily on Pascha (CPG 4605): a case study in approaching the question(s) of Pseudepigrapha

Mark Huggins (University of Edinburgh)

14:25-14:50 ‘Blood for the Blood God!’. The survival of ritual sacrifice in Late Antiquity and Beyond

Michael Burling (University of Birmingham)

14:50-15:15 The celebration of saints in Theodore the Studite’s Hymns

Maria-Lucia Goiana (University of Vienna)

15:15-15:40 Pascha in Contemporary Greek poetry: five poets at the Cross

Mariza Parasyri (King’s College London)

14:40-16:00 Coffee Break

Panel Four: Celebrations and the Imperial Ceremonial (Chair Lauren Wainwright)

16:00-16:25 ‘Daphne/Laurus‘: triumphal rhetorics and wedding ceremonies in the Imperial Palaces of Late Antiquity

Alfredo Calahorra Bartolomé (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

16:25-16:50 The imperial dress and the coronation ceremony: the etiquette and the signs of excellence of the rank

Antonio Pio Di Cosmo (Pontificio Istituto Orientale)

16:50-17:15 The political significance of Maria Skleraina’s ceremonial performances as Sebaste (1042-1046)

Ewan Short (Cardiff University)

17:15-17:40 When celebration goes wrong: the collapse of the Middle Byzantine honours system

James Cogbill (University of Birmingham)

17:40-18:00 Final Remarks

Dr Rhoads Murphey

18:00 Wine reception

Registration for the event can be found at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/celebrations-in-the-eastern-mediterranean-private-and-public-tickets-60699884990.

A book stall and poster display will be running throughout the day in Arts LR3.

Come and celebrate with us!

The Organising Committee

Rachael Helen Banes

Alessandro Carabia


This is a student-led postgraduate colloquium organised under the auspices of the College of Arts and Law, University of Birmingham. 

CFP Colloquium 2019

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Diogenes- Call for Contributions

The editors of Diogenes are welcome to announce the Call for Contributions for the next issue of Diogenes to be published in October 2019. The deadlines for contributions is the 30th of May!

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GEM- FIFTEEN SHADES OF GOAT: EXPLORING SOUTH ITALIAN VARIETIES OF GREEK AND THEIR REVITALISATION

Fifteen Shades of Goat: Exploring South Italian Varieties of Greek and their Revitalisation

Presented by Francisco Lopez-Santos Kornberger
(University of Birmingham)

The Whitting Room, Arts Building (R436), University of Birmingham
17:15, Wednesday 28 March


The language has a stunning richness in the lexis of the pastoral world, with, for instance, 9 different words for different types of fig (e.g. affàci, apochìdi, klostò, karapòzzulo), and more than 15 words to describe the colours of a goat (e.g. rusocèfalo, kasbopò, rusokàpulo, sparedda, mavropò), but still has no word for electric light, fridge, television, or radio. When these objects entered people’s everyday life, the speakers had already decided that the language was too old to be spoken by their children and therefore they did not upgrade Greko for the modern society. (M.O. Squillaci 2017: 16-17)
 
In Apulia and Calabria, the southernmost regions of the Italian peninsula, one can find speakers of unique varieties of Greek, the existence of which dates back to either millennia-old or ninth-century migrations. Due to their particular position in central Mediterranean, and their relative isolation from other Greek communities during the last millennium, these varieties of Greek (Griko in Salento and Greko in Calabria) are markedly different from the varieties spoken in Greece and Cyprus. In this informal presentation, I will summarise some particularities of Griko and Greko, the way in which the social background of their speakers shaped their language, and the wide range of attitudes towards it from the speakers and the surrounding, Romance-speaking population. I will also bring in plenty of anecdotes from my visits to Apulia and Calabria, my attempts to learn the language and contribute to its revitalisation, and some potential benefits of learning Griko for Byzantine, Ottoman, and Modern Greek researchers.