Discovering Byzantium in Istanbul: Scholars, Institutions, and Challenges, 1800–1955. 16-18 November 2017, Pera Museum, Istanbul

On the tenth anniversary of its foundation, the Istanbul Research Institute will host Discovering Byzantium in Istanbul: Scholars, Institutions, and Challenges, 1800–1955, a symposium examining the development of Byzantine studies in Istanbul during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The symposium will take place at the Pera Museum, November 16–18, 2017.

At a time when classical antiquity continued to be the main attraction drawing Western scholars to the Eastern Mediterranean, Byzantine history and archaeology became a new field of competitive scientific exploration in the former Byzantine capital. Some of the major themes and issues to be addressed at Discovering Byzantium in Istanbul are scholars’ motivations and incentives for studying the empire founded by Constantine in 330 AD, the means by which they accessed the monuments and material wealth of Constantinople, what they were allowed to see and under what circumstances and conditions, and the networks they established among themselves and with authorities from government and cultural institutions. The activities of newly founded foreign institutes and museums are also examined, along with scientific competition at the international level, including the reactions of Turkish scholars.

The period covered by Discovering Byzantium in Istanbul begins with the emergence of major archaeological expeditions in the Eastern Mediterranean and is rich in major historical events and findings that brought the Ottoman Empire and the modern Turkish republic to the fore. It ends with the International Congress of Byzantine Studies convening its tenth conference, for the first time meeting in Istanbul. The contributions analyze archival material with the aim of bringing to light unknown and unexplored sources of research.

The symposium is being organized under the direction of Olivier Delouis and Brigitte Pitarakis, both from the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) in Paris.

The programme is available on the Pera Museum web page: click here!

 

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Discovering Byzantium in Istanbul: Scholars, Institutions, and Challenges, 1800–1955. 16-18 November 2017, Pera Museum, Istanbul

Irfan Shahîd’s history of the Arab’s interactions with Rome and Byzantium before the rise of Islam is available for download

Dumbarton Oaks is happy to announce that all seven volumes of Irfan Shahîd’s monumental Byzantium and the Arabs, published by Dumbarton Oaks Publications, are available for free download from our website.

Irfan Shahîd knew even as an undergraduate at Oxford that the role of the Arabs in Roman history would be his life’s work. Rome in late antiquity was caught between the German tribes in the west and the Arabs in the east. German scholars had engaged with “the German problem,” but the Arabs did not have their historian, Shahîd recalled in his 2008 oral history for Dumbarton Oaks. “No one has really dealt with Arabs as part of Roman history.”

From an early interest in the role the Arabs in al-Andalus played in the creation of Western Europe, Shahîd’s encounter with the medievalist Ernst Kantorowicz at the Institute for Advanced Study prompted him to start with the East—and to discover Dumbarton Oaks, where he was a Junior Fellow in 1954–55 and with which he would have a lifelong association. The outcome of this early shift in focus is the history of the Arabs’ relationship with Rome and Byzantium before the rise of Islam and the Arab conquests of the seventh century. If his work has one virtue, Shahid said, “it will be because I’ll be the first historian to have filled the gap of all these centuries with my gaze fixed on the seventh to know exactly what happened and why it happened the way it did.”

Shahîd’s project was originally conceived as a three-volume work, the first treating Rome and the Arabs from Pompey to Constantine, the second Byzantium and the Arabs from Constantine to Heraclius, and the third the rise of Islam and the Arab conquest. The eventual seven volumes cover the first two parts, with the final part, on the seventh century, left incomplete at Shahîd’s death in 2016. Sidney Griffith hailed the work as “a major step forward in our knowledge of the history and culture of the world in which Islam was born.”

 

Irfan Shahîd’s history of the Arab’s interactions with Rome and Byzantium before the rise of Islam is available for download

Parekbolai. An Electronic journal for Byzantine Literature

PAREKBOLAI is an electronic journal, which is published yearly by an Editorial Committee of Byzantinists of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The name is inseparably linked with the well-known Commentaries of Eustathius of Thessalonica, and was chosen as a sign of both the journal’s association with the University of Thessaloniki as host institution and its subject matter.

The journal publishes original articles on Byzantine Literature and Philology as well as related text-based studies covering the period from the 4th to the 15thcenturies in English, French, German, Greek, and Italian. All articles submitted will be peer-reviewed by two members of the journal’s International Editorial Advisory Board, and once approved will be uploaded immediately as pdf files, which will be created by the Editors in consultation with the authors.

Have a look at the journal here!

 

Parekbolai. An Electronic journal for Byzantine Literature

Call for Papers – Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era

Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era

Organised by Andrea Mattiello (University of Birmingham) and Maria Alessia Rossi (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

To be held at the University of Birmingham

24th-25th February 2017

Submission deadline: 30th September 2016

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire, such as the Adriatic and Balkan regions, the major islands of Cyprus and Crete, and the regions surrounding the cities of Constantinople, Thessaloniki, and Mystras. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

In its last centuries, the political entity of the Empire of the Romaioi released cultural and artistic energies migrating towards new frontiers of intellectual achievements. The intent is to counter-balance the innovation of these works of art with the notion of decline and the narrative of decay frequently acknowledged for this period; and to promote an understanding of transformation where previous cultural heritages were integrated into new socio-political orders.

The Symposium – hosted on the afternoon of the 24 and the morning of the 25 February – will bring together established scholars, early-career scholars, and postgraduate students. Three keynotes will provide the methodological framework for the discussion; while the selected papers will focus solely on the visual expressions and cultural trajectories of the artworks produced during the late Palaiologan Era.

The Workshop, hosted on the afternoon of the 25 February, will offer the opportunity to further the discussion in a more informal setting and for a selected number of Master students to interact and offer brief presentations.

Postgraduate students and early-career scholars are invited to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers on art and architecture history, material culture, visual aspects of palaeography and codicology, and gender studies.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Gift exchange in view of diplomatic missions or dynastic marriages both within the Empire and with its neighbours
  • Visual evidence of the interaction between the Emperor and the Patriarch
  • Innovations in the visual agenda of the Palaiologan dynasty
  • Aspects of religious iconography and visual representations of theological controversies, i.e. Hesychasm
  • Artistic patronage and manuscript production as the outcome of dynastic and institutional interactions
  • Visual and material production as the outcome of political and social circumstances, i.e. the Zealot uprising or the Unionist policy
  • Evidence of artistic exchanges in the depictions of women, men, and children during the Palaiologan Era

Titles of proposed papers, abstracts of 250 words, and a short CV should be sent to Maria Alessia Rossi – m.alessiarossi@icloud.com and Andrea Mattiello – axm570@bham.ac.uk by 30 September 2016.

Call for Papers – Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era

Exhibition – Buried Treasures: Uncovering Hoards

Buried Treasures: Uncovering Hoards

Coin Galley, Barber Institute of Fine Arts

6th May 2016 – 26th February 2017

LECTURE SERIES

Wednesdays, 1.10 – 2pm

FREE, no booking required

Introducing Buried Treasures

11 May

Maria Vrij, Coin Curator

The Marriage of History and Science

Testing the Purity of Byzantine Gold Coinage

18 May

Dr Jonathan Jarrett, University of Leeds

Viking Hoards that Changed History

From Watlington to the Vale of York

25 May

Dr Gareth Williams, The British Museum

Hoards of the Later 3rd Century from Britain

Why are there so many?

1 June

Prof Roger Bland, University of Leicester

 

GALLERY TALK

Introduction to Buried Treasures

Tuesday 10 May, 1.10pm

Maria Vrij, Coin Curator

 

COIN GALLERY TOURS

Third Sunday of the Month

17 April; 15 May; 19 June; 17 July; 18 September, 2.30pm

 

For more details, click here.

Exhibition – Buried Treasures: Uncovering Hoards

BBPN – Jack of all Trades, Master of None? Interdisciplinary and Cooperative Methodologies for Byzantinists

Event poster

Jack of all Trades, Master of None? Interdisciplinary and Cooperative Methodologies for Byzantinists

British Byzantine Postgraduate Network

The Whitting Room (Arts 436), University of Birmingham

5:15 PM 5th May 2016

On Thursday, 5th May 2016 at 5:15, the University of Birmingham will be hosting the next British Byzantine Postgraduate Network event: ‘Jack of all Trades, Master of None? Interdisciplinary and Cooperative Methodologies for Byzantinists’.

Much has changed in the scholarship of the humanities in recent years, with an emphasis both on interdisciplinary research and the use of new methodologies. When embarking on our own research with Byzantine source material, we can be faced with what seems to be an overwhelming array of sub-methodologies and languages. With so many different avenues of research, each with their own specific difficulties and problems, what is the Byzantinist to do?

In the spirit of the British Byzantine Postgraduate Network this event will create a space where early-career Byzantinists can discuss solutions to this disciplinary dilemma. We will ask how we, as early-career scholars, can challenge the current structures of academia in order to create a more interdisciplinary and collaborative research culture.

The evening will take the form of a series of speakers: Maria Vrij (Birmingham; numismatics), Sihong Lin (Manchester, social network analysis), Hugh Jeffrey (Oxford, archaeological theory), Adam Simmons (Lancaster, medieval ethnography), Vicky Manolopoulou (Newcastle, GIS and technologies). There will be a round table discussion and wine reception.

To book a place, please contact Lauren Wainwrightme lxw936[at]bham.ac.uk.

BBPN – Jack of all Trades, Master of None? Interdisciplinary and Cooperative Methodologies for Byzantinists

Training – International Byzantine Greek Summer School (IBGSS)

International Byzantine Greek Summer School (IBGSS)

Trinity College Dublin

18th July-12th August 2016

The Department of Classics, Trinity College Dublin is delighted to host the 2016 International Byzantine Greek Summer School (IBGSS). We are delighted to welcome this well-established and successful programme to Dublin, under the direction of Dr Anthony Hirst, building on fifteen years previously at the University of Birmingham (2012-15) and Queen’s University Belfast (2002-2011).

APPLICATIONS AND COST

  • The cost for two weeks will be €400 and for all four weeks €800.
  • Please note that this does not include accommodation. You will be responsible for booking your own accommodation, but we will be able to offer advice.

The application process is in two stages

  1. Complete the application form and e-mail it as an attachment to Patrick Sammon
  2. Make an online payment

Queries should be directed to Patrick Sammon

COURSE DETAILS

The International Byzantine Greek Summer School offers courses in medieval Greek language at three levels:

LEVEL 1 BEGINNERS (18 – 29 JULY)

The Level 1 course is for absolute beginners in Byzantine Greek. It starts with the Greek alphabet and takes students through the basic grammar of Greek to the point where they can begin to translate simple Greek texts with the aid of a dictionary.

Further information about the Level 1 course

LEVEL 2 INTERMEDIATE (1 – 12 AUGUST)

The Level 2 course carries straight on from the Level 1 course, completing the coverage of basic Greek grammar and introducing students to a variety of Greek texts. Each year a number of people take both courses.

If the number of participants justifies it (as it did 2012-4) an additional course, Level-2.5 (Higher Intermediate), will be introduced for the more advanced applicants to Level-2, but this course is not offered as a confirmed option at the application stage.

Further information about the Level 2 and 2.5 course

LEVEL 3 ADVANCED READING (1 –12 AUGUST)

Level 3 is an Advanced Reading course for those who successfully completed Level-2 in a previous year and have made considerable further progress since, or those have acquired the necessary familiarity with Greek by other means.

Further information about the Level 3 course

TEACHING STAFF

The following staff will be teaching on the Summer School in Trinity in 2016:

  • Dr Anthony Hirst (Course Director)
  • Dr Cosetta Cadau
  • Sean McCrum
  • Patrick Sammon
  • Adrian C.S. Saunders

Further details about the teaching staff

Training – International Byzantine Greek Summer School (IBGSS)