Gem – Christmas Party

GEM will be celebrating its Christmas party on Wednesday (December 6th) from 17:15 onwards in the Whitting room (Arts 436). Food, drinks, Christmas songs, and fun!

Also, our Most Illustrious committee would like to propose some alternative designs for the GEM logo. You can find some of them in the poster below.

We will debate over this issue on Wednesday, so please come and share your opinion with us!

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Gem – Christmas Party

GEM- Coin handling session

Coin handling session at the Barber Coin Room

 by Maria Vrij (Barber institute, Coin curator)

Coin Room (The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, first floor).

4:00 PM 29th November 2017

This evening will be the occasion for knowing more about the Coin collection at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts. Maria Vrij, current Coin Curator, will guide us into an interactive handling session!

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GEM- Coin handling session

GEM – Gendered Illnesses of the ‘Sick Man’: Modernisation in the late Ottoman Empire

Gendered Illnesses of the ‘Sick Man’: Modernisation in the late Ottoman Empire

Presented by Demet Gülçiçek (University of Warwick)

The Whitting Room (Arts 436), University of Birmingham

5:15 PM 22nd November 2017

 

Modernisation in the context of Ottoman Empire was mostly considered as curing the ‘sick man’. The Ottoman Empire was sick, the cure was in Europe; but the ways to reach the cure was the main discussion. In relation to these discussions, modernisation took different forms under different regimes in the Ottoman Empire but gender was always one of the main constitutive elements during these processes. I will try to show how the discourse of the sickness, the cure and reaching the cure – modernisation in general – was produced through gendered discourses.

‘Wrong’ modernisation (also called Westernisation) debates within the intellectual circles of the time (late 19th century and early 20th century) is a good case to understand the complexity between modernisation and gender. Wrong modernisation was seen as a deviation from an ‘essence’ which might refer to different notions such as Ottoman, Muslim, Turkish based on the context. But in any case, mentioning to wrong modernisation was possible through constitutions of femininities and masculinities. As an example, I will be focusing on two characters from two different novels (Felatun Bey and Rakim Efendi by Ahmet Mithat and Ask-i Memnu by Halit Ziya). Through these novels, I will try to show how too-modernised male figure was feminised and how too-modernised woman figure was presented as immoral.

22217990_10213045134419753_1276024878_oMithat Kutlar, “Osmanlı Kadın Dergileri içinde Erkekler Dünyası Dergisi,” Fe Dergi 2, sayı 2 (2010):1-15.

GEM – Gendered Illnesses of the ‘Sick Man’: Modernisation in the late Ottoman Empire

GEM – Ideology and Characterization in Themos Kornaros’ Fiction (1929-1957): from Individuality to Collectivity.

Ideology and Characterization in Themos Kornaros’ Fiction (1929-1957): from Individuality to Collectivity

Presented by Anastasia Tantarouda Papaspyrou

The Whitting Room (Arts 436), University of Birmingham

5:15 PM 15th November 2017

 This paper aims to show that the turn of the Greek Left towards the nation from the early 1940s onwards is reflected in the narratives of the twentieth-century Greek author Themos Kornaros. I suggest that Kornaros’ narratives can be classified into two distinct phases based on the characters he shaped.

Therefore, my presentation will be divided in two parts based on these phases. The first phase, that covers the books published from 1929 to 1943, includes characters that are marginal and stand out for their individuality, since any form of social cohesion is absent. As I will show, the writer accentuates the individuality of the characters by emphasising on their low social status or on their distinctive natural characteristics.


However, from 1945 onwards he made a U-turn by creating characters that melt into the empathetic collectivity. These characters could be called ‘collective’ in the sense that their defining characteristic is their identification with society, not as an abstract notion, but equated to the Greek nation. The characters of the second phase (1945-1957) form an integral part of the Greek nation and they are linked to the Greek tradition and the Christian religion.

 

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GEM – Ideology and Characterization in Themos Kornaros’ Fiction (1929-1957): from Individuality to Collectivity.

Gianluca Foschi – Music and the Liberal Arts in the Early Byzantine Mediterranean

This Wednesday at 17.15 we welcome Gianluca Foschi, current PhD student at Newcastle University for talking about Music and Liberal arts in Byzantium!Gianluca

Musical conceptions in the early Byzantine Mediterranean were deeply rooted in philosophy and permeated with cosmological meanings. Music was indeed a mathematical science aimed to achieve the essence of the universe through the investigation of sound in connection to arithmetic, geometry and astronomy. The pluralistic discussions about music comprised, for instance, the interpretations of Plato’s Timaeus, the highlighting of the musical properties of geometrical shapes, and the investigation of harmonic proportions in the heavenly world. The study of music as a mean to achieve the ultimate truth involved the main poles of education in the Mediterranean and was emphasised by philosophers and Christian theologians.

Gianluca Foschi – Music and the Liberal Arts in the Early Byzantine Mediterranean